Anyomi2013

Référence

Anyomi, K.A. (2013) Spatial and temporal complexities in forest productivity-climate relationships within northern temperate and boreal forests of eastern Canada. Thèse de doctorat, Université Laval. (URL )

Résumé

Forest productivity is driven by direct climatic and non-climatic factors which are transient or permanent in nature. Their effects vary through time and along spatial scales, thus assuming equal sensitivities across time and space where heterogeneous growth responses exist has consequences for the prediction of forest productivity. There is growing evidence of global changes, associated by rather diverse and in some cases contrasting changes in growth. It is necessary to constantly monitor growth and productivity and regional studies are therefore necessary to consider alternative productivity estimation procedures. This thesis was therefore aimed at determining to what extent global, regional and local changes in climate and disturbance regimes affect forest site productivity within eastern Canadian boreal and northern temperate forests located within the province of Québec. Stem analysis data was first obtained from 32 aspen dominated stands that spanned a 5-degree of latitude-wide transect representing a large climate gradient with different surficial deposit types in order to study real-time height growth. Plonki’s site index model calibrated from stem analysis data was used in estimating a height growth index for these 32 stands. Over 4000 temporary sample plots were also obtained from stands of varying age, structure and species compositional gradients in order to determine feedback effects of vegetation on productivity, which are indirect effects of climate and soil. A site index model calibrated from temporary sample plots (and currently used in Québec for growth and yield estimation) was used in estimating site index for mixed aspen stands. Finally, the last chapter of this thesis used an aspecific height-age relationship. Results of the first chapter show that within aspen dominated stands, height growth is mainly driven by the annual cumulative sum of growing degree days with an explanatory capacity as good as that of more complex processed-based variables. Also, aspen productivity in pure stands is better explained with a model that assumes that specific populations have different response functions to climate, demonstrating that climate sensitivity is not stable across a species’ geographic range. Within mixed species stands, stand structure and species composition are the major drivers of aspen productivity. Variability in productivity is better explained at the level of landscapes than stand-level. An interaction between landscape- and stand-level drivers influence stand-level productivity, suggesting that a hierarchical modelling approach is more appropriate than a single-level model. Since stand structural and compositional changes are dynamics that characterize stand succession, it is inferred that successional changes and not climate drive productivity in mixed stands, when measured with site index. Our results seem to concur with the fundamental idea of the existence of heterogeneity (in forest productivity) due to intra- and inter-specific interactions in a way that produces structures capable of adapting through time, as suggested by the concept of complex adaptive systems.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@PHDTHESIS { Anyomi2013,
    TITLE = { Spatial and temporal complexities in forest productivity-climate relationships within northern temperate and boreal forests of eastern Canada },
    AUTHOR = { Anyomi, K.A. },
    SCHOOL = { Université Laval },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    NOTE = { CEFTMS, Raulier, F. and Mailly, D. },
    ABSTRACT = { Forest productivity is driven by direct climatic and non-climatic factors which are transient or permanent in nature. Their effects vary through time and along spatial scales, thus assuming equal sensitivities across time and space where heterogeneous growth responses exist has consequences for the prediction of forest productivity. There is growing evidence of global changes, associated by rather diverse and in some cases contrasting changes in growth. It is necessary to constantly monitor growth and productivity and regional studies are therefore necessary to consider alternative productivity estimation procedures. This thesis was therefore aimed at determining to what extent global, regional and local changes in climate and disturbance regimes affect forest site productivity within eastern Canadian boreal and northern temperate forests located within the province of Québec. Stem analysis data was first obtained from 32 aspen dominated stands that spanned a 5-degree of latitude-wide transect representing a large climate gradient with different surficial deposit types in order to study real-time height growth. Plonki’s site index model calibrated from stem analysis data was used in estimating a height growth index for these 32 stands. Over 4000 temporary sample plots were also obtained from stands of varying age, structure and species compositional gradients in order to determine feedback effects of vegetation on productivity, which are indirect effects of climate and soil. A site index model calibrated from temporary sample plots (and currently used in Québec for growth and yield estimation) was used in estimating site index for mixed aspen stands. Finally, the last chapter of this thesis used an aspecific height-age relationship. Results of the first chapter show that within aspen dominated stands, height growth is mainly driven by the annual cumulative sum of growing degree days with an explanatory capacity as good as that of more complex processed-based variables. Also, aspen productivity in pure stands is better explained with a model that assumes that specific populations have different response functions to climate, demonstrating that climate sensitivity is not stable across a species’ geographic range. Within mixed species stands, stand structure and species composition are the major drivers of aspen productivity. Variability in productivity is better explained at the level of landscapes than stand-level. An interaction between landscape- and stand-level drivers influence stand-level productivity, suggesting that a hierarchical modelling approach is more appropriate than a single-level model. Since stand structural and compositional changes are dynamics that characterize stand succession, it is inferred that successional changes and not climate drive productivity in mixed stands, when measured with site index. Our results seem to concur with the fundamental idea of the existence of heterogeneity (in forest productivity) due to intra- and inter-specific interactions in a way that produces structures capable of adapting through time, as suggested by the concept of complex adaptive systems. },
    URL = { https://corpus.ulaval.ca/jspui/handle/20.500.11794/24461 },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2019-10-09 },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Le CEF est un
regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Colloque du CEF ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Formations et Écoles d'été

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Congrès Mycelium ****************** **********************************************************

Septembre 2021

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - IWTT ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

  • Voici une liste (clairement incomplète) des packages R axés sur l'écologie! N'hésitez pas à ajouter à la liste

Voir les autres...